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Diet

diet-diabetes

DIET AND HEALTHY EATING

Eating Well-Balanced Meals

Nutrition is a critical part of proper diabetes management. Learning what to eat, how much to eat, and when to eat is a key part of learning to take care of your blood sugar levels. Choosing your food wisely can help you feel better from day to day, lose weight if you need to, and lower your risk of heart disease, stroke, and other problems caused by diabetes.

The thought of a diet can feel overwhelming when you’re learning to manage your type 2 diabetes. However, diet is not only about eating less of the foods that you love or about losing weight—it’s also about making some simple lifestyle changes that you can enjoy and stay with. You may be surprised to find that you can eat right while still eating many of the foods that you like. When you have type 2 diabetes, eating well-balanced meals in the correct amounts can help you manage your blood sugar levels.

Eat to live!

There is concrete proof in these documentaries that people who were taking medication for Diabetes, High Blood Pressure, and Heart disease medicines no longer had the need to take medicine after they went to a plant based food diet. You may not need to make a drastic change initially, but without a doubt the proof is in the greens!

http://www.forksoverknives.com | http://www.takepart.com/foodinc/


diabetes impact

What is the impact of diabetes?

Diabetes is the third leading cause of death in the United States after heart disease and cancer.

Over time, diabetes can lead to blindness, kidney failure, and nerve damage. These types of damage are the result of damage to small vessels, referred to as microvascular disease. Diabetes is also an important factor in accelerating the hardening and narrowing of the arteries (atherosclerosis), leading to strokes, coronary heart disease, and other large blood vessel diseases. This is referred to as macrovascular disease. Diabetes affects approximately 17 million people (about 8% of the population) in the United States. In addition, an estimated additional 12 million people in the United States have diabetes and don't even know it.

From an economic perspective, the total annual cost of diabetes in 1997 was estimated to be 98 billion dollars in the United States. The per capita cost resulting from diabetes in 1997 amounted to $10,071.00; while healthcare costs for people without diabetes incurred a per capita cost of $2,699.00. During this same year, 13.9 million days of hospital stay were attributed to diabetes, while 30.3 million physician office visits were diabetes related. Remember, these numbers reflect only the population in the United States. Globally, the statistics are staggering.

Direct and Indirect Costs of Diabetes

Diabetes is one of the most costly health problems in America. The ADA estimates that health care and other costs directly related to diabetes treatment, as well as the costs of lost productivity, run $218 billion annually.

How does diabetes impact lifestyle?

Diabetes also imapcts the lives of the people around you.

There is no doubt that diabetes has an impact on the lifestyle of the patient. Diabetes is associated with long-term complications. Uncontrolled, the disease can lead to blindness, heart disease, stroke, kidney problems, amputations, and nerve damage. Diabetes can lead to the loss of the right to drive, complicate pregnancy, and cause birth defects.

diet-diabetes

DIET AND HEALTHY EATING

Eating Well-Balanced Meals

Nutrition is a critical part of proper diabetes management. Learning what to eat, how much to eat, and when to eat is a key part of learning to take care of your blood sugar levels. Choosing your food wisely can help you feel better from day to day, lose weight if you need to, and lower your risk of heart disease, stroke, and other problems caused by diabetes.

The thought of a diet can feel overwhelming when you’re learning to manage your type 2 diabetes. However, diet is not only about eating less of the foods that you love or about losing weight—it’s also about making some simple lifestyle changes that you can enjoy and stay with. You may be surprised to find that you can eat right while still eating many of the foods that you like. When you have type 2 diabetes, eating well-balanced meals in the correct amounts can help you manage your blood sugar levels.

Eat to live!

There is concrete proof in these documentaries that people who were taking medication for Diabetes, High Blood Pressure, and Heart disease medicines no longer had the need to take medicine after they went to a plant based food diet. You may not need to make a drastic change initially, but without a doubt the proof is in the greens!

http://www.forksoverknives.com | http://www.takepart.com/foodinc/

diabetes education
diabetes treatment

Diet & Exercise can help control diabetes

Diabetes is a disease in which your blood glucose, or sugar, levels are too high. Glucose comes from the foods you eat. Insulin is a hormone that helps the glucose get into your cells to give them energy. With Type 1 diabetes, your body does not make insulin. With Type 2 diabetes, the more common type, your body does not make or use insulin well. Without enough insulin, the glucose stays in your blood.

Over time, having too much glucose in your blood can cause serious problems. It can damage your eyes, kidneys, and nerves. Diabetes can also cause heart disease, stroke and even the need to remove a limb. Pregnant women can also get diabetes, called gestational diabetes

Symptoms of Type 2 diabetes may include fatigue, thirst, weight loss, blurred vision and frequent urination. Some people have no symptoms. A blood test can show if you have diabetes. Exercise, weight control and sticking to your meal plan can help control your diabetes. You should also monitor your glucose level and take medicine if prescribed.
NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases

Your Guide to Diabetes: Type 1 and Type 2

Type 1

Diabetes means your blood glucose, or blood sugar, is too high. If you can't control your diabetes with wise food choices and physical activity, you may need diabetes medicines. The kind of medicine you take depends on your type of diabetes, your schedule, and your other health conditions.

With Type 1 diabetes, your pancreas does not make insulin. Insulin is a hormone that helps glucose get into your cells to give them energy. Without insulin, too much glucose stays in your blood. If you have type 1 diabetes, you will need to take insulin.

Type 2

Type 2 diabetes, the most common type, can start when the body doesn't use insulin as it should. If your body can't keep up with the need for insulin, you may need to take pills. Some people need both insulin and pills. Along with meal planning and physical activity, diabetes pills help people with type 2 diabetes or gestational diabetes keep their blood glucose levels on target. Several kinds of pills are available. Each works in a different way. Many people take two or three kinds of pills. Some people take combination pills. Combination pills contain two kinds of diabetes medicine in one tablet. Some people take pills and insulin.

We want to enhance the quality of life of all persons impacted by diabetes through education